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Formula 1 2018 season preview: teams, drivers, calendar and regulations

Calendar for season 2018

The 2018 Formula One season start on March 25 in Melbourne and ends on November 25 in Abu Dhabi, after 21 races. The French Grand Prix returned to the calendar for the first time since 2008. The race is due to return to the Circuit Paul Ricard, which last hosted the French Grand Prix in 1990. The German Grand Prix also returned to the championship after a one-year absence, with the Hockenheimring scheduled to host the race. The Malaysian Grand Prix, which was part of the championship from 1999 to 2017, was discontinued.

#dategrand prixcircuit
125.3AustralianMelbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne
28.4BahrainBahrain International Circuit, Sakhir
315.4ChineseShanghai International Circuit, Shanghai
429.4AzerbaijanBaku City Circuit, Baku
513.5SpanishCircuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona
627.5MonacoCircuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo
710.6CanadianCircuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal
824.6FrenchCircuit Paul Ricard, Le Castellet
91.7AustrianRed Bull Ring, Spielberg
108.7BritishSilverstone Circuit, Silverstone
1122.7GermanHockenheimring, Hockenheim
1229.7HungarianHungaroring, Budapest
1326.8BelgianCircuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot
142.9ItalianAutodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza
1516.9SingaporeMarina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore
1630.9RussianSochi Autodrom, Sochi
177.10JapaneseSuzuka International Racing Course, Suzuka
1821.10USACircuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas
1928.10MexicanAutodromo Hermanos Rodriguez, Mexico City
2011.11BrazilianAutodromo Jose Carlos Pace, Sao Paulo
2125.11Abu DhabiYas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi

Constructor Championship - preseason odds

teamoddsteamodds
Mercedes1.5Williams200
Red Bull3.7Force India250
Ferrari4.5Toro Rosso500
McLaren20Haas1000
Renault100Sauber1000

Main team changes

McLaren terminated their engine partnership with Honda and signed a three-year deal with Renault.

Toro Rosso parted ways with Renault and came to an agreement to use Honda power units.

Driver changes in 2018

Williams driver Felipe Massa retired from F1 at the end of the 2017 championship. He was replaced by former Renault test driver Sergey Sirotkin.

Toro Rosso signed Pierre Gasly and Brendon Hartley as their full-time drivers. Both Gasly and Hartley made their F1 debuts with the team in the latter stages of the 2017 championship. Daniil Kvyat left the team, securing a development role with Ferrari.

Charles Leclerc, the reigning Formula 2 champion, is scheduled to make his competitive debut with Sauber. Pascal Wehrlein was ultimately unable to secure a race seat and was instead enlisted as one of Mercedes' test and reserve drivers.

Technical regulations

The FIA banned the use of "shark fins", a carbon fibre extension to the engine cowling aimed at directing airflow over the rear wing. The use of "T-wings", a horizontal secondary wing mounted forward of and above the rear wing, was also banned.

Every F1 car must feature the Halo cockpit protection system - designed to further improve driver safety in the event of an accident, and in particular to deflect debris away from the head.

Drivers will be required to wear gloves containing biometric sensors which record their vital signs in order to better assist marshals and recovery crews in assessing their condition in the event of an accident.

Suspension systems that could alter the car's aero performance over a lap not allowed.

Sporting regulations

The quantity of power unit components a driver may use during the season was reduced from four complete power units to three, where each of the power unit components is considered separately.

Any driver who earns a grid penalty of 15 places or more will have to start from the back of the grid. If more than one driver receives such a penalty they will be arranged at the back of the grid in the order in which they changed power unit elements.

As in 2017, tyre suppliers Pirelli will make three dry-weather compounds available to teams at each Grand Prix. However, for 2018 those three will be selected from a broader range of compounds, which now includes the new, pink-marked hypersoft at one end of the spectrum and the orange-marked superhard at the other.

Ferrari

Sebastian Vettel (5), Kimi Raikkonen (7)
engine: Ferrari 063
chasis: SF71H

Force India

Sergio Perez (11), Esteban Ocon (31)
engine: Mercedes M09 EQ Power+
chasis: VJM11

Haas

Romain Grosjean (8), Kevin Magnussen (20)
engine: Ferrari 063
chasis: VF-18

McLaren

Stoffel Vandoorne (2), Fernando Alonso (14)
engine: Renault RE18
chasis: MCL33

Mercedes

Lewis Hamilton (44), Valtteri Bottas (77)
engine: Mercedes M09 EQ Power+
chasis: F1 W09

Red Bull Racing

Daniel Ricciardo (3), Max Verstappen (33)
engine: TAG Heuer
chasis: RB14

Renault

Nico Hulkenberg (27), Carlos Sainz Jr. (55)
engine: Renault RE18
chasis: RS18

Sauber

Marcus Ericsson (9), Charles Leclerc (16)
engine: Ferrari 063
chasis: C37

Toro Rosso

Pierre Gasly (10), Brendon Hartley (28)
engine: Honda RA618H
chasis: STR13

Williams

Lance Stroll (18), Sergey Sorotkin (35)
engine: Mercedes M09 EQ Power+
chasis: FW41

2017 driver standings

1Hamilton363
2Vettel317
3Bottas305
4Raikkonen205
5Ricciardo200
6Verstappen168
7Perez100
8Ocon87
9Sainz Jr.54
10Hulkenberg43
11Massa43
12Stroll40
13Grosjean28
14Magnussen19
15Alonso17
16Vandoorne13
17Palmer8
18Wehrlein5
19Kvyat5
20Hartley0
21Gasly0
22Ericsson0
23Button0
24Di Resta0
25Giovinazzi0

2017 team standings

1Mercedes668
2Ferrari522
3Red Bull368
4Force India187
5Williams83
6Renault57
7Toro Rosso53
8Haas47
9McLaren30
10Sauber5

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